8 Things City Planners Must Know to Improve Public Health

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By Robby Layton, Ph.D

Park and trail systems planners, public health professionals, and community leaders are committed to improving public health. And they know better than anyone that fewer than half of Americans are getting the recommended amounts of physical activity. 

Centennial Park in Rifle, Colorado, provides walking accessibility throughout the city as well as plenty of ways for residents to get physical activity: playgrounds, a splash pad, bike trails, and nature paths.

Centennial Park in Rifle, Colorado, provides walking accessibility throughout the city as well as plenty of ways for residents to get physical activity: playgrounds, a splash pad, bike trails, and nature paths.

If your city is like most, parks and trails can be the secret sauce for healthy living. Being outside in natural settings reduces stress, increases social interactions, and improves environmental sustainability. All that plus giving people a chance for some physical activity!

Public Health Goals Accomplished with Parks and Trails 

Here are a few ways to accomplish your public health goals with parks and trails:

8 Facts You Need to Know to Effectively Use Parks and Trails to Improve Public Health

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Walking access brings communities outside, such as in Utah Park in Aurora, Colorado, 

Walking access brings communities outside, such as in Utah Park in Aurora, Colorado, 

We've helped many planners and community leaders provide a healthier quality of life for their communities. If you need any assistance in improving aspects of public health in your town--physical, mental, social, economic, and environmental--leave us a comment below.